Can an Employer Fire An Employee Because the Employee Refuses to Commit Perjury?

No.  Kentucky courts have ruled that an employee fired because he or she refuses to commit perjury in a legal proceeding may pursue a claim for wrongful discharge to recover their damages as well as punitive damages. Hill v Kentucky Lottery Corp, 327 SW3d 412 (Ky 2010) and Northeast Health Mgmt., Inc. v. Cotton, 56 S.W.3d 440, 449 (Ky App. 2001). The Sixth Circuit recently upheld a jury's verdict in a fired employee's favor where the jury found that the employee was fired for refusing to commit perjury in regard to a sex discrimination case against the employer. Burton v. Zwicker & Associates, No 13-5406 (August 22, 2014)

The Burton decision is discussed further on Robert Abell's Kentucky Employment Law Blog: An Employer Cannot Fire An Employee Because the Employee Refuses to Commit Perjury.